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Orchestra Revolutionnaire et Romantique

Gardiner conducts Beethoven: Symphony No 1

From the anarchic chords that open his First Symphony, Beethoven’s symphonies are more than just music: they’re acts of revolution.

Orchestra Revolutionnaire et Romantique and Gardiner

Gardiner conducts Beethoven: Symphony Nos 2 and 3

If Beethoven’s Second Symphony is the sound of a young artist stretching his wings, the Third – the Eroica – is the moment when his genius takes flight.

Alison Balsom holding trumpet black background

Britten Sinfonia with Alison Balsom

Superstar Alison Balsom performs a virtuosic programme of music from Purcell to Birtwistle via Scarlatti, celebrating the remarkable voice of the trumpet.

John Edward Gardiner conducting on stage

Gardiner conducts Beethoven: Symphony Nos 4 and 5

Sir John Eliot Gardiner’s Beethoven Symphony cycle reaches its halfway point with the most famous four notes in the history of music.

John Edward Gardiner conducting on stage 2010

Gardiner conducts Beethoven: Symphony Nos 6 and 7

Birds sing, horns call and streams flow: there’s no experience more refreshing than Beethoven’s lovely Pastoral symphony. And there’s none more exuberantly physical than his unstoppable Seventh.

John Edward Gardiner conducting

Gardiner conducts Beethoven: Symphony Nos 8 and 9

Beethoven’s Ninth is the summit of any Beethoven cycle; some might say of classical music itself. All the more reason to pair it with the uproarious Eighth – pure comedy, delivered with a punch.