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BBC SO/Brabbins

Remembrance and reflection

Conrad Tao gazing dreamily

From the foreboding to the consoling, music shaped by the culmination of World War II including the UK premiere of Dai Fujikura’s concerto after Hiroshima.

Little survived the Atomic Bomb’s impact on Hiroshima in 1945. But a musical instrument did – a piano belonging to a girl named Akiko who was one of thousands killed in the blast. Akiko’s Piano is Dai Fujikura’s plea for peace in the form of a concerto written, in part, for the very instrument Akiko left behind. 

The work’s UK premiere is heard in between symphonies shaped by the closing days of World War II: one by Ralph Vaughan Williams shaken by violent eruptions, and one by Igor Stravinsky in which a filmic first movement reflects the scorched-earth tactics deployed by Japanese forces in China.
 

The performance will finish at approximately 9:15pm. It includes a 20 minute interval.

£10

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