Up the Junction (12A) + ScreenTalk with Nell Dunn

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Up the Junction

Ken Loach’s controversial adaptation of Nell Dunn’s short story collection shocked audiences in 1965 with its portrayal of young, working-class women in Battersea.

Three young women are working in a South London factory: Rube and Sylvie want to have fun, while Rube's sister Eileen wants to train as a nurse.

Like its source material - based on conversations Dunn overheard among young women in Clapham - the dramatisation is fragmented, containing snippets of other people's stories.

Combining documentary and fiction, Ken Loach brought Nell Dunn's striking writing into the homes of millions in 1965, receiving a record 400 complaints when first broadcast for its language, talk of sex and depiction of abortion.

Michele Roberts hosts Nell Dunn for a post-film ScreenTalk. The event is followed by a book signing. 

In association with Silver Press to celebrate the publication of Dunn’s Talking to Women, available to purchase after the screening.

UK 1965 Dir Ken Loach 75 min

Michèle Roberts, half- English and half-French, began writing in the late 1960s. She wrote for the underground and feminist presses, and took part in street theatre. She was one of the pioneering feminist writers of the 1970s. She has published over twenty books, including novels, poetry, short stories, essays and artist's books that have been translated into many languages. Her twelve highly acclaimed novels include The Looking Glass and Daughters of the House, which won the WHSmith Literary Award and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize, Ignorance, which was longlisted for the Women's Prize for Fiction 2013 and most recently The Walworth Beauty (2016).

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